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Fast deliberation is related to unconditional behaviour in iterated Prisoners’ Dilemma experiments

Sustainable AI, Data & Robotics

NOV 2022

Fast deliberation is related to unconditional behaviour in iterated Prisoners’ Dilemma experiments

Abstract

People have different preferences for what they allocate for themselves and what they allocate to others in social dilemmas. These differences result from contextual reasons, intrinsic values, and social expectations. What is still an area of debate is whether these differences can be estimated from differences in each individual’s deliberation process. In this work, we analyse the participants’ reaction times in three different experiments of the Iterated Prisoner’s Dilemma with the Drift Diffusion Model, which links response times to the perceived difficulty of the decision task, the rate of accumulation of information (deliberation), and the intuitive attitudes towards the choices. The correlation between these results and the attitude of the participants towards the allocation of resources is then determined. We observe that individuals who allocated resources equally are correlated with more deliberation than highly cooperative or highly defective participants, who accumulate evidence more quickly to reach a decision. Also, the evidence collection is faster in fixed neighbour settings than in shuffled ones. Consequently, fast decisions do not distinguish cooperators from defectors in these experiments, but appear to separate those that are more reactive to the behaviour of others from those that act categorically.

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Contributors

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Tom Lenaerts

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Keywords

Drift Diffusion Model

FARI

Iterated Prisoner’s Dilemma

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